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Choosing A Kitchen Tile

Today, tiles are very commonly found in most kitchens, whether they are installed as small splash back features behind cookers and sinks or as full kitchen floors and walls. It has become increasingly popular for modern kitchens to have tiles fixed in place from floor to ceiling, offering a very modern and stylish effect.

Floor Tile Size
For very small kitchens, you should consider small floor tiles of around 30cm square in order to create a good flow. Larger tiles than this will look best in kitchens that have a lot of floor space so that most of the tiles can be laid without cutting. Large floors also look very good if laid with multi-format tiles – tiles of the same design that are laid in a few different sizes as a repeating pattern.
Wall Tile Sizes
For splash back areas, very small kitchen tiles or no more than 10cm square are often a popular choice, although choose colours carefully to avoid making the area look too cluttered. If you are planningto tile full walls from floor to ceiling, both small and large format tiles can work well.
Kitchens need to be a hygienic places, which makes tiles ideal. Tiles often give a fresh appearance, and they are very easy to clean by just wiping down which is why hygiene is one of the  first things that come to mind when thinking about tiling a kitchen. It is also possible to get grouts which have antibacterial additives mixed into them, preventing the growth of common food area bacteria such as E Coli and Salmonella.
Don't forget that the kitchen is perhaps the most frequently used room in any house, as well as often being the entrance to the garden, sleeping areas for pets and storage for heavy appliances. It is thus very important to choose a floor tile that is hard wearing, resistant to scratches and easy to clean.
A common choice is porcelain floor tiling which is very hard-wearing, however is aiming for a more rustic look then natural stone tiles like quarry and slate can offer a fantastic unique effect and be just as durable.
Tile Colour
There should always be an emphasis on personal choice when choosing colour schemes, but always consider the colour of your kitchen units and surroundings when choosing the colour and design for your tiles.
Warm looking colours such as creams and terracotta can contribute to creating an impression of warmth which is popular in more old-fashioned kitchens. However don’t disregard other brighter colours, which can offer some very stylish finishes, especially if your kitchen is large and modern.
Note that while floor tiles may feel cool on bare feet, their temperature does depend on the underlying surface. For example, tiling onto wood (which can ‘breathe’) will create a warmer feel than onto concrete. 
Another option is undertile heating, a modern solution to warming floors and often entire rooms. There are many benefits to undertile heating such as giving you more wall space, as there is no need for radiators. Undertile heating is also very efficient, giving low running costs when compared to equivalent heating with a radiator or more conventional heating source.

Floor Tile Size

For very small kitchens, you should consider small floor tiles of around 30cm square in order to create a good flow. Larger tiles than this will look best in kitchens that have a lot of floor space so that most of the tiles can be laid without cutting. Large floors also look very good if laid with multi-format tiles – tiles of the same design that are laid in a few different sizes as a repeating pattern.

Wall Tile Sizes

For splash back areas, very small kitchen tiles or no more than 10cm square are often a popular choice, although choose colours carefully to avoid making the area look too cluttered. If you are planningto tile full walls from floor to ceiling, both small and large format tiles can work well.

Kitchens need to be a hygienic places, which makes tiles ideal. Tiles often give a fresh appearance, and they are very easy to clean by just wiping down which is why hygiene is one of the first things that come to mind when thinking about tiling a kitchen. It is also possible to get tile grouts which have antibacterial additives mixed into them, preventing the growth of common food area bacteria such as E Coli and Salmonella.

Don't forget that the kitchen is perhaps the most frequently used room in any house, as well as often being the entrance to the garden, sleeping areas for pets and storage for heavy appliances. It is thus very important to choose a floor tile that is hard wearing, resistant to scratches and easy to clean.

A common choice is porcelain floor tiling which is very hard-wearing, however is aiming for a more rustic look then natural stone tiles like quarry and slate can offer a fantastic unique effect and be just as durable.

Tile Colour

There should be an emphasis on personal choice when choosing colour schemes, but always consider the colour of your kitchen units and surroundings when choosing the colour and design for your tiles.

Warm looking colours such as creams and terracotta can contribute to creating an impression of warmth which is popular in more old-fashioned kitchens. However don’t disregard other brighter colours, which can offer some very stylish finishes, especially if your kitchen is large and modern.

Note that while floor tiles may feel cool on bare feet, their temperature does depend on the underlying surface. For example, tiling onto wood (which can ‘breathe’) will create a warmer feel than onto concrete.

Another option is undertile heating, a modern solution to warming floors and often entire rooms. There are many benefits to undertile heating such as giving you more wall space, as there is no need for radiators. Undertile heating is also very efficient, giving low running costs when compared to equivalent heating with a radiator or more conventional heating source.

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